Does Your Youth Program Transact or Transform?

Transformational or transactional youth activities
Are your youth activities transformational or transactional?

When was the last time you thought about WHY young people come to your youth program or classroom?

  • Do they come to get jobs, earn money, and in order to become gainfully employed?
  • Are there rewards for attendance or contests for participating?
  • Are youth punished in some way for not attending?

These are traits of a transactional youth activity.

  • Do youth see their capacity to create, build, change, and make the life they want to live as the most important reason for coming?
  • Are adults seeking to learn with youth or take action together for change?
  • Can young people choose whether or not they want to be there and adapt for changing times?

This is a transformational program.

Transactional Youth Activities

A lot of youth programs in general are built on transactional relationships based in giving and receiving, i.e. “I give you this and you get that.” Forming the premise for much of our economy, this type of relationship is evident in…

  • Many schools where students earn grades by performing certain tasks;
  • Stores where youth pay money for food, clothes, music and more;
  • Friendships that are reliant on trading attention when needed.

A lot of youth involvement, youth voice, and youth engagement activities are transactional relationships where young people become involved because they can get a reward for being there. This might be a grade, kuddos from adults, or a bullet point on their resume.

Transactional youth activities have several elements. They…

  • Focus on extrinsic motivation
  • Appear practical
  • Resist change
  • Discourage independent youth actions, thinking and reactions
  • Reward performance
  • Constrain thinking
  • Rely on passive youth voice
  • Deliver directive youth activities
  • Emphasize formal structure
  • Focus youth on their own self-interest and reassure adults’ self-interest

They are also common, and easily compared to other youth-serving activities. Sometimes these relationships are necessary, especially at the outset of a youth activity. However, the challenge is that many adults believe this is the only way to involve young people.

Transformational Youth Activities

Alternatively, Youth Infusion insists that youth and adults join in together because each age group changes because of the interaction. These transformational relationships allow everyone the room they need in order to be whole, become engaged, and make a difference in their own lives as well as the lives of the people around them.

Transformational youth programs have many elements. They…

  • Check adultism
  • Are clearly co-led with youth and adults
  • Encourage healthy risk-taking
  • Engage youth in difficult decision-making
  • Share organizational consciousness between youth and adults
  • Inspire and foster new thinking
  • Adapt, pivot and respond
  • Are proactive
  • Are visionary

Transformational youth activities are unfortunately rare throughout the youth service sector, and throughout education. Throughout their processes, they are revelatory, teaching youth and adults new things while expanding the impact each has on the other and on themselves. By their nature, transformational youth activities are creative, necessitating unique, divergent, and eclectic thinking, actions, and outcomes. Because of this, they are also particularly lifting to those who are involved.

Is your program transactional or transformational? Are you ready for transformation? It’s exciting, rewarding and enlivening to be engaged in transformational work, but can be frustrating to change from one style to the next. It can also be necessary to focus on basic human needs and interact in a transactional way with youth, at least for a period of time.

If you’re ready to explore whether your youth activity, youth program, youth organization or K-12 school can move from transactional to transformational approaches, we want to help. Contact us to learn more about Youth Infusion right now »

Author: Adam F.C. Fletcher

I'm a speaker, writer, trainer, researcher and advocate who researches, writes and shares about education, youth, and history.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s